Exercise science

Why do we need to eat for the type of training we do?

By January 16, 2019 September 27th, 2019 No Comments

If you are serious about your training or you just want to do things property, in the most efficient and healthiest way possible, you should know this.

Our bodies have a couple of energy systems at their disposal, depending on the type of training they are being exposed to. In short, they can be divided into:

  1. Creatine phosphate system. The body uses this system for the 1-3 repetitions range. That’s our by far the fastest energy system that uses 3sec worth of ATP (energy molecules) that each and every one of us has stored in our cells. The body basically uses it when in need for quick explosive demands, such as heavy lifting, where the rep range is 1-3. Once that is used up, it takes about 3 minutes, to recover completely and restore that ATP for this system to be available again. Once this happens and we don’t take the 3 minutes, and as we continue to lift, the body switches to
  2. Anaerobic system. This energy system requires glucose. It doesn’t require oxygen because you are working too fast for the body to use oxygen and oxidize fat; that right there is why we need CARBOHYDRATES for intense trainings. It is physiologically impossible for body to efficiently use any other macronutrient, and this is precisely why if you want to do allow carb diet, you need to revise your training program as well.

This energy system has a by-product, lactate, which is fatigue that we all feel once this builds up. Now if I we decide to to something very light instead, for a longer while, I the body would switch to

  1. Aerobic system. This system uses oxygen and can use fats as a slower, and not as quick energy production system. Consequently, here is where you can be on a high fat – low carb diet, as long as you keep the intensity low. But not the other way around. This is one of the reasons our 1 rep max, 12rep max and 50 rep max will differ so much. (Simplified analysis)

This is why it’s crucial to EAT FOR THE TYPE OF TRAINING you perform. You can’t, for example, be in ketosis (no carbohydrates) and do HIIT. You are fighting a windmill; your body CAN’T produce energy efficiently. Albeit, you will be able to train somehow, but your performance will be significantly worsened, your muscle mass jeopardised, and if this situation goes for a while, so will your health.

 

Take home message

Food is information and fuel for our bodies and switching to a different diet without knowing how the body works, can significantly impact your performance, your result, and ultimately – your health.